Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘photography’

Madison WI’s Overture Center reminds me of a smaller scale version of NYC’s Guggenheim Museum. The shell-like spiral staircase and open atrium are irresistible to the lens. Quick post this morning, additional images to come:

Overture Center Staircase

From the third floor of the Overture Center, looking down the main staircase.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Went to see FSA-era documentary photographer Ida Wyman’s “Chords of Memory” exhibit at the Watrous Gallery in Madison yesterday. Also checked out the Real/Surreal exhibit at MMoCA (Madison Museum of Contemporary Art), on loan from the Whitney Museum in New York. Both shows delivered: Wyman, humanity’s persistence & resilience. R/S intense reflection. Both, consideration of how the late 30’s pre & post WWII period affected peoples’ apprehension of a once benevolent world.
Surrealism /magical realism considered as a reaction to the atrocities of Fascism- which many of the featured artists witnessed firsthand– takes on an entirely different weight than the usual plastic amusement generated by melting clocks. If yr near Madtown and can get to these shows before 4/24, go.

Seen in the vicinity:

At the Museum, culture /technology

At the Museum, culture /technology


Near Capitol Square, the intersection of Rock, Paper, Scissors, Madison WI

Near Capitol Square, the intersection of Rock, Paper, Scissors, Madison WI

Read Full Post »

wpid-20140313_193317_LLS.jpgUnder the influence of the 1980’s book New Topographics…phone camera no editing

image

image

image

Read Full Post »

At the Museum

Something that used to be forbidden, now permitted if not actually encouraged: museum photography. In their contemplative or perhaps quizzical states the viewers draw the eye nearly as much as the artwork. In this case a review of contemporary photography.

At the Museum, NYC

Contemporary Photography exhibity, MOMA, NYC 2013

Read Full Post »

After reading Rebecca Solnit’s Unfathomable City and Wanderlust these past few weeks my attention’s been re-focused on the history of landscape as cultural narrative and on human modified landscapes a reflection of our cultural values. Or the dis/integration thereof. The 1975 photography exhibition New Topographics: Photographs of a Man-Altered Landscape” came to my attention this morning and I’ve since been web diving for information about the individual photographers who participated in this re-en/visioning of the traditional narratives of vast, wild, sublime American landscape. Their post-industrial, post-suburban, interstate sliced still lives of the land made subservient to human whim resonate deeply within my own assessment of what has changed everywhere we live in the past 50 years.

Frank Gohlke’s work should be known by anyone interested in contemporary interpretations of landscape. The following interview and retrospective slide show of the images he considers most significant nicely summarized his vision and intentions:

http://www.terrain.org/interview/28/

here today I’m editing & printing cityscapes and trying to design a promo postcard for the April show. Never was I much good at making choices and there are a lot of them to wade through, which photo, what dimensions, what to say, how much. learning as I go!  Thanks for stopping by the Driftless World.

Image

Hall Street, Brooklyn New York October, 2013

Read Full Post »

Two photographs I edited today: The first a freshwater lake at Belleplain State Forest in south Jersey, the second a dry wash canyon in northern New Mexico, an ancient seabed now a semi-arid desert. The contrast between these two images triggered my thinking about how a single natural  resource such as water determines us. The native peoples of the American Southwest have seen the rise and fall of entire cultures driven by aridity. Here are the photos, and something like a Chautauqua in their wake:

Northern New MexicoHow does water affect the places we choose to live and our sense of habitation within that place? So many popular communities around the country are at the water’s edge; the beauty of the sea, the vastness of the ocean compel our imaginations. Their abundance has fed our bodies for generations by supplying a clean and renewable food source. Now the twin macro-scale disasters of the BP Deepwater Horizon gulf oil rig blowout in 2010 and the radioactive seepage of Japan’s Fukishima nuclear plant, coupled with decades of other sustained non-point insults from human activities leaves us with a huge question mark as the ocean’s inhabitants  demonstrate the consequences by sickening, dying and disappearing. Each summer once crystalline waters curdle into a stinking soup in Florida Bay, smothering the coral reefs along the Keys beneath algal blooms the consistency of jello. My generation has born witness to  these radical changes in the order of magnitude by which human activities have overtaken nature.

The famous springs of central Florida that poured freshwater at rates measuring billions of gallons daily are predicted to run dry within the decade as development investors continue to sink wells to bottle water, water golf course and irrigate cattle pastures.  The Great Lakes, having sustained industrial insults for decades pre-EPA, recovered dramatically at the end of the 20th Century. They  now face renewed assault as energy and mining investors consider transporting heavy tar sands crude viaBelleplain State Forest, NJ lake freighters and opening the world’s largest open pit iron mine along the shores of Lake Superior. The Elk River drowned in chemicals last month in West Virginia, where mining now blows off mountaintops to extract coal from open pits. All across America hydraulic fracturing-fracking– cracks shale deep underground to release natural gas, threatening local water tables’ integrity while at the same time contaminating millions of gallons of fresh water with drilling chemicals  and then pumping the entire toxic mess that results back underground. That water is gone from the surface life cycle for good. And is replaced by…nothing. There is no alternative. On this planet or any other within reach.

It seems to me a kind of blind madness that globally mankind continues to assault the life-sustaining system of this one hospitable planet we can call home, without any viable means to restore them. We are bad at imagining scale and good at denial; pollution and degradation formerly were localized, contained, infrequent horrors, like Love Canal. The majority of the world’s wild open places were untainted sanctuaries, life preserving wells from which we could draw the future to repopulate damaged places. This is no longer the case. At every turn the natural world has  sustained and continues to aggregate collateral damage in the name of human infrastructure and profit, yet the value of those irreplaceable and finite  natural resources is nowhere figured into the economic equations of the profit machine.

Today in the headlines, California and the West’s cataclysmic drought, a “500” year event. Towns will be without water. For the first time, backup systems from surrounding communities fail to meet the need, so trucks must come from afar bearing potable water to sustain residents. Crops have gone unplanted, animals and lawns, a perished afterthought. Those people have been stopped in their tracks, their attentions now riveted on their dry cups. Were investors or industry or politicians to come and attempt to add a teaspoon of contaminants to any of those precious tankers of water, the people would seize and restrain and punish them. And so it should also happen at the macro scale. The margin for humanity’s errors isn’t nearly as large as we presume.

Read Full Post »

With the weekend weather in our region expected drop the windchill close to -60, my thought have turned to sunshine and warmer places. Cape May county NJ last fall was beautiful every day, a paradise for being outdoors. Lots of ocean, beach and birds. This shot was taken along the Delaware Bay side of the peninsula, where quiet beaches and the cleaned up Delaware Bay make it a peaceful alternative to the busy Jersey Shore towns to the east.  This great white egret didn’t think much of us passing by his marsh however..:), even though we were picking up trash as we walked. Which I think is so necessary to do whenever you visit wild places. Even if its just one small bag you carry out, the difference is made for the critters that live there, and collectively, for the health and beauty of our one blue planet. If most people would do this consistently and work together,  we’d see results, don’t you think?

t Egret, Norbury's Landing

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

River of Word Flow

Rhymes and Reasons

Alec Soth's Archived Blog

Alec Soth's Blog from 2006-2007

eduardo libby: photography blog

Writings about the art and technique of photography. Mostly with Nikon equipment.

RTW Roxy

23 years old girl travelling solo on a motorcycle.

Caitlin Jean Russell

Travel Tips, Photographs and Experiences

Roxy Travels

23 years old girl travelling solo on a motorcycle.

John Wreford Photographer

Words and Pictures from the Middle East & Balkans

Elan Mudrow

Smidgens

Frank Solanki

If you want to be a hero well just follow me

Travelling around the world

Traveller, photography

TravellersPlanet

a pair of ragged claws scuttling

Street Photography

Straßenfotografie • Beobachtungen am Wegesrand

Through Open Lens

Home of Lukas Kondraciuk Photography

%d bloggers like this: